Beware the Southern Yellow Pine Demons

I’ve been making a stand for the shop that will hopefully get most of the boring tools in one spot. The idea is that there will be shelves or drawers or something below that I can use for stuff like auger bits, forstner bits, countersinks, and that sort of thing. On top, I can put my small old drill press. Think of it as a boring hand-and-machine combo.

I’ve been making it out of southern yellow pine because it’s cheap and I have enough on hand. The downside is that some of my stock is really tough. I chipped my mortise chisel so badly that I had to regrind. Twice. And it’s not like I was doing “frowned-upon” levering or anything.

All of the mortise-and-tenon joints for the frame are done as of today, yielding this:

The victimized (yet ultimately victorious) mortise chisel is in view here.

Confession: After slugging it out through six tenons with my tenon saw, I did the remainder of the tenon cheeks with the bandsaw. Eh, nah, I’m not sorry about that. Some of the latewood in that stock was just ossified granite, and I needed to get this thing done.

In any case, test-fitting everything seems to yield a thumbs-up:

It’s in clamps now, in the glue-up stage. I still need to make the top. Time to scrounge to see what I might have lying around.

This is actually the second in a line of stands like this that I’ve made, with the first done not too long after I first moved to this shop. That one is not quite as “refined” because I didn’t really bother to prepare the stock uniformly, and the legs are just 2x4s instead of the square posts that I made by laminating 2x stock for this new one.

Perhaps if I didn’t have a bunch of yellow pine lying around, I would have gotten some lighter-duty construction wood to make this from–it probably wouldn’t matter, except for weight.

2 thoughts on “Beware the Southern Yellow Pine Demons

  1. Southern yellow pine is attractive in my opinion. What made it unattractive was those ugly looking chairs and double bunk beds, not to forget the stool that were all coated in orange shellac that were made in the 70s and 80s. Their end grain is tough and difficult to leave a clean surface with a hand plane. It’s also harder than most timbers to pare end grain. But I’ve never heard of a mortise chisel chipping in that wood.

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    • This wood was particularly tough and heavy. I’m sure that sitting around unused for a few years didn’t make it any softer, either. The chisel itself hasn’t given me trouble in the past. It’s just a pretty ordinary William Ash pigsticker from (I guess) the mid-19th century.

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